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Hiking

Northern New England’s mountains are criss-crossed with hiking trails, woods roads, and animal paths. Within a short distance from Dartmouth are many different types of hikes — from the Appalachian Trail which cuts through downtown Hanover before ascending back into the woods, to rocky paths through the alpine vegetation above the Mount Moosilauke treeline, to the wooded trails of Vermont ducking past corn fields and grazing cows. And there are still large wooded areas to explore, like the Second College Grant.

Hiking Philosophy

Since there are as many hiking philosophies as hiking philosophers, our advice is: Hike your own hike. Some people hike for the views, some for the accomplishment, some for the company, some for the solitude, some to appreciate nature, and some just for the hiking itself. You’ll quickly discover your reasons for hiking and they will guide you to your own hiking style.

Hike Safe

We support the Hiker Responsibility Code, developed and endorsed by the White Mountain National Forest and New Hampshire Fish and Game.

You are responsible for yourself, so Be Prepared:

  1. With knowledge and gear: Become self reliant by learning about the terrain, conditions, local weather and your equipment before you start.
  2. To leave your plans: Tell someone where you are going, the trails you are hiking, when you will return and your emergency plans.
  3. To stay together: When you start as a group, hike as a group, end as a group. Pace your hike to the slowest person.
  4. To turn back: Weather changes quickly in the mountains. Fatigue and unexpected conditions can also affect your hike. Know your limitations and when to postpone your hike. The mountains will be there another day.
  5. For emergencies: Even if you are headed out for just an hour, an injury, severe weather or a wrong turn could become life threatening. Don’t assume you will be rescued; know how to rescue yourself.
  6. To share the hiker code with others.

Leave No Trace

We encourage you to follow the practices endorsed by the national Leave No Trace education program:

  • Plan Ahead and Prepare
  • Camp and Travel on Durable Surfaces
  • Pack It In, Pack It Out
  • Properly Dispose of What You Can’t Pack Out
  • Leave What You Find
  • Minimize Use and Impact of Fires

Last Updated: 1/11/17